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Moscovites on the Menu
 
Moscovites on the Menu 
International Wine & Food Society Journal, March 2012, p 17 

 Update 27 Sept 2012 regarding the final article in the series here.

Welcome to an IWFS first - an online version of a journal article.  It is experimental and reader views are invited.  If there are links which don't work, you will help other readers enjoy the venture more by making contact.

As IWFS members have seen the pictures in the journal, it simplifies matters to repeat them later.  There are more.

Structure of the page and navigation

The text from the journal is repeated with links to supporting material. Some of it is general and the rest of the links take you to explanations of the dishes. As you know, the series is based on the Le Répertoire de la Cuisine and you are taken to the pages in it which help the explanation.

When the text includes mention of a previous article in the series, there is a direct link. There is also a list of the all previous articles with links.

The page ends with a Dictionary and History of Cooking, Food, and Beverage Terms.


Using the links:

When the text covers a dish which is later explained, the dish title is in blue text. It is followed by a link to text much further down the page. You then see a return-to-context link. There is an auxillary links panel.

-o-O-o-




                                                                                                                                                                                                                  
      We look this time at Russian notables and ways of presenting food associated with them.  
      Moscow is our anchor within the
alliterative titles within this series.   In the course of its history, the city has served as the capital of a progression of states, from the medieval Grand Duchy of Moscow and the subsequent Tsardom of Russia to the Soviet Union. Thus, it serves us well in looking at the way our celebs are celebrated on the menu.  

     Service à la russe is the historically-determined name (probably through Catherine's influence) for modern dining that involves courses being brought to the table sequentially.  It contrasts with service à la française in which all the food was brought out at once in an impressive, but often impractical display.    (The term entrée comes from the time when diners ate the main course on entering the room.)  The Russian Ambassador Alexander Kourakin is credited with bringing service à la russe to France in the early 19th century, and it soon caught on in EnglandRead much more here 

     We have all enjoyed Russian salad and, perhaps, Charlotte Russe.   Sponge fingers and bavarois (similar to mousse) are set in the mould and, on tipping out, it is served with cream. picture   Crêpes Russes are when the pancake mixture includes crushed sponge fingers and Kummel.  

     Perhaps you have enjoyed Fraises Romanov on your menu travels, even within Europe. The Répertoire de la Cuisine simply states that strawberries are soaked in Curaçao and served with Creme Chantilly (whipped double cream and sugar flavoured from the vanilla pod).  The Romanov family or The House of Romanov was the second and last imperial dynasty to rule over Russia, reigning from 1613 until the February Revolution abolished the crown in 1917.  Nicholas II is not to be found in the Répertoire.   Large joints of meat such as Selle d'agneau (Saddle of lamb) Romanov are served  with stuffed cucumber on a bed of potato puree accompanied by diced mushroom and celeriac bound in horseradish sauce. note Noisettes de chevreuil (venison cutlets) Romanov are sauté and dressed in  crown formation with pastry barquettes filled with cucumber/mushroom puree. note Filet de veau (veal fillet) Romanov is when the fillet is taken off the ribs, cut lengthwise, coated with Bechamel sauce combined with sliced cèpes, flavoured with paprika, and placed back on the ribs.  More Bechamel is poured over, this time combined with prawn coulis.  If that is insufficient, add braised fennel.  note

     The title Tsar, Tsar or Czar (as with Kaiser) stems from Caesar and on the menu, Tsarine or Tzarine are well represented as the Tsar's wife..  Consomme Tsarine is made from chicken stock and served with diced vesiga (sturgeon spinal cord).  Filet de sole Tzarine is poached with cucumber pieces, olives and served with a paprika-flavoured Mornay (cheese) sauce.  If you hope to make Timbale Tzarine, the copper mould is lined with pastry and lardons follow.  Add foie gras, truffles and snipe pieces and cover with pastry before baking.  When cooked, top up with savoury jelly flavoured with Madeira.  Cool, refrigerate, turn upside down on a dish and garnish with sliced truffle. note

     The Wladimir garnish takes us into deeper political water when we consider Lenin. His aim was to rid Moscovites and others of the Romanov family. It cannot be verified that he is the inspiration for Poularde pochée Wladimir. The boiling fowl would chuckle as well as cluck at her double-sauce enrichment. After poaching, the stock is converted to Sauce Suprême via the roux process. Hollandaise Sauce is finished with chopped tarragon and chervil and the sauces are combined fifty-fifty. The chicken is covered with the new sauce and decorated with tarragon leaves plus strips of celery, carrot and truffle. Huitres Vladimir are poached oysters covered with Sauce Supreme. Fried breadcrumb and grated cheese enhance an under-the-grill finish. Even if it could be proved that Lenin enjoyed fine food, today’s chefs would probably prefer Prince Vladimir as the inspiration for these delights.       

     As for Vladimir’s, even Lenin’s, Moscovites, they are remembered on the menu as well. Sauce Moscovite is a savoury brown sauce finished with Madeira. Soufflé Moscovite - ”parfum Curaçao et fraise.”. That was easy. The Répertoire can be a challenge if an English version is not to hand. Gelée Moscovite - “sanglée legerement” which literally means “lightly strapped”. Go easy on the gelatine? You wouldn't tie a ribbon round it as with the Charlotte Russe see picture.   Gelée Russe, however, may help. The jelly is whisked when almost set and moulded as desired. More interesting than offering your visitors weak jelly. Gelée Marbrée (or Rubanée), while not Russian, is Gelée Russe made with varying flavours and colours and set in layers. Click here.

     The last "layer" in the series is to be "Musicians on the Menu" and Tchaivosky is the link. 


     Update 27 Sept 2012 - the article will be published in the December journal.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
                                                                                                                                                

   

      --
Note on Prince Vladimir

"In A.D. 988 Prince Vladimir made the Byzantine variant of Christianity the state religion of Russia . The Russian church was subordinate to the patriarch of Constantinople , seat of the Byzantine Empire. The original seat of the metropolitan, as the head of the church was known, was Kiev. As power moved from Kiev to Moscow in the fourteenth century, the seat moved as well, establishing the tradition that the metropolitan of Moscow is the head of the church." more

To context   To start of text     Auxillary links panel
 
     

 

 

 

Charlotte Russe                 to context here     

           


                                        

                                         The Swiss-roll version - picture source  
  

The mould is not lined with sponge fingers to make the one with the red ribbon. 

However, the jelly is set in it before the mixture is added. 

 

                                 

                                  Lenin  Life

 

Nicholas II  picture source            source


                                                                                  Service a la russe

                                                                                  The first style to sequence courses.




another from same source  



I will produce a supplement to The Royal Table if readers request it. 

To start of text     Auxillary links panel


Other articles in the series

 


Garnishes on Stage--

Martial Mentions on the Menu

Martial Milestones on the Menu

Monarchs on the Menu

The Royal Table not published and referred to in the articles.

More Monarchs on the Menu

Mandarins on the Menu=

Middlemen on the Menu

 

Ministers on the Menu


Non-members can see a magazine and Middlemen in the flesh.

Click for a copy of

'Food & Wine' September 2011 and find p 26
 



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Le Répertoire de la Cuisine

 The Repertoire has its own website. Here is a picturesque example .
As far as searches are concerned, it is a difficult site. There's more in the Wine section as seen
here.
 
 

Le Repertoire de la Cuisine Hardback.

 

The edition we are interested in is here.

 

"The style of Le Répertoire is highly unusual in that the recipes provided are little more than aides-mémoires and assume a great deal of background knowledge. The book does not make any allowances for the novice cook: no quantities are given (a chef is expected to be able to estimate these for himself) and frequent use is made of terms of art which are opaque to those without the necessary background."  source 

Let's remind ourselves about what was said beyond it being the chef's Bible earlier: 

 That was in June 2010.   We move on to December 2010 with:

 

 

We now delve into the book. 





Recipes is an overstatement. 





The second page of two on the scanner sometimes leans to starboard.




                       

Auguste Escoffier  Louis Saulnier and Edouard Brunet, perhaps, are posthumously in various guises on Facebook.

To start of text      Auxillary links panel


Here are the sections of the book:
 

 Page top
 

 


Our first look at a page relates to Selle d'agneau (Saddle of lamb) Romanov

Each page carries its section letter in the English version.  After this page, it is not included.

 

To context here

Page top
 

Noisettes de chevreuil Romanov

Noisettes de chevreuil (venison cutlets) Romanov are sauté and dressed in crown formation with pastry barquettes filled with cucumber/mushroom puree.

When you read it, you see that Poivrade sauce was omitted in the journal text due to space limitations.  There are none here.  Read the garnish first.

 

 
Sauce Poivrade

Now you see why it was omitted.

 

 

The same in French

 

 

"Marinade" in English and "marmade" in French deserve discussion.  The French have the same meaning for marinade as in English.  Why marmade? 

The strainer and étamine also could be looked at.  In its heyday, Sauce Hollandaise was squeezed through a tammy cloth and French editions refer to it as étamine. Sauce Piquante, as you read, uses the term.  Sauce Poivrade is a different type of sauce. Either way, hygiene officers would be in tears today if the tammy cloth re-appeared! 

To context here
.

 Page top Auxillary links panel
 

 

Filet de veau (veal fillet) Romanov

It is when the fillet is taken off the ribs, cut lengthwise, coated with Béchamel sauce combined with sliced cèpes, flavoured with paprika, and placed back on the ribs. More Bechamel is poured over, this time combined with prawn coulis. If that is insufficient, add braised fennel.

The full description is repeated with emphasis on sliced cèpes.

Here is the right page. The chef zooms down to the foot of the page. If he knows how to cook a saddle of lamb in Metternich style, he gets on with the job. If, however, he doesn't, he looks across at the description. It is almost an endless avenue as you will see after reading this page. 

 

 Look across the page now for Metternich:

 

 

 

The avenue has ended. Back to sliced cèpes. You note that in the English translation, they are minced.  The French editions give émincé  

 

Isn't French easy when you have seen all the relevant English before?!  Whoever translated émincé into sliced  was neither French nor cuisinely proficient.  Mince anything in the mushroom family and you end up with gunge-laden water.

   

 

 

To see who Metternich was, click here and take your pick. You met him at the foot of the page here.

To context here
.

 Page top To start of text  
 


Noisettes

Our last look at Romanov follows. You read above that Noisettes de chevreuil (venison cutlets) Romanov are sauté and dressed in crown formation with pastry barquettes filled with cucumber/mushroom purée.

 

 

To context here 
 
Page top
 

We move on to Timbale Tzarine.

You see that the chef needs to refer elsewhere. That has been done for you above. Here it is again:

If you hope to make Timbale Tzarine, the copper mould is lined with pastry and lardons follow. Add foie gras, truffles and snipe pieces and cover with pastry before baking. When cooked, top up with savoury jelly flavoured with Madeira. Cool, refrigerate, turn upside down on a dish and garnish with sliced truffle.

 

 

 



To context here       To start of text      Auxillary links panel

 

 

  

Jelly

This clears the mist surrounding jelly in the journal.

The Répertoire can be a challenge if an English version is not to hand. Gelée Moscovite - “sanglée legerement” which literally means “lightly strapped”. Go easy on the gelatine? You wouldn't tie a ribbon round it as with the Charlotte Russe. Gelée Russe, however, may help. The jelly is whisked when almost set and moulded as desired. More interesting than offering your visitors weak jelly. Gelée Marbrée (or Rubanée), while not Russian, is Gelée Russe made with varying flavours and colours and set in layers.

We look to the original text:

 

 


None the wiser?

 

 

Moscovites at the time of publication are more than slightly iced.

Next time you serve jelly you had almost forgotten you had put it in the deep-freeze to set quickly, you enter the room with flourish and announce "Gelée Moscovite"!

 

Moscovite or Muscovite? It depends on whether your context is Moscow, Muscovy or the mineral. Put Moscovite into Google and you are switched to Muscovite. Our title prefers Moscovite as the Répertoire, written by those of French persuassion, prefers it.
 
 
To context here   
 
"Miss Helyett" was a three-act operetta here .

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Auxillary links panel


J

This colour text signifies the item was not mentioned in the printed journal article.

A

Other articles in the series.

C

Contact
here

J

Jelly   here 

M

Why marmade? here

Metternich - who was he? here

N

Noisettes - venison cutlets  here  here

O

Orloff was famous enough in earlier times to be menu-ised.   Count Orloff here.  He was no spring-chicken! here
 

P

Poivrade Sauce here

R

Le Répertoire de la Cuisine
here

S

Saddle of lamb Romanov here here

Service à la française here

Service à la russe here


Souvaroff was also famous enough in earlier times to be
menu-ised
.  Facebook descendants (?) and recipes here.

Stroganoff - family here, plenty of recipes here.



T


Timbale Tzarine here here


V

Veal fillet Romanov here here


~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~


You could also explore this useful Dictionary and History of Cooking, Food, and Beverage Terms here. 


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