G A S T R O N O M Y
PUBS HOME PAGE
.
Why we eat WWE
Model foundation
The family
Pigeon-holes
National gastronomy 1986
National Gastronomy 1986++
National gastronomy 2011
National Gastronomy ++
Final Model text
....Using the Final Model
.
. . .Final model alone
.
.
.
O T H E R . P U B L I C A T' N S
Pubs before 2007
Publications list
.
INTRODUCING IWFS ARTICLES
Molecular Gastronomy
Restaurant review
Garnishes on Stage
Martial Mentions on the Menu
Martial Milestones on the Menu
Monarchs on the Menu
The Royal Table
More Monarchs on the Menu
Mandarins on the Menu
Middlemen on the Menu
Ministers on the Menu
Moscovites on the Menu
Musicians on the Menu
.
Food fit for a Queen
Our founder’s voice - 1 - link
Our founder’s voice - 1
Our founder's voice - 2
Our founder's voice - 3
.
.
Wine - a matter of balance
Wine words 1: Let the wine do the talking
Wine words 2: Binning the words
Wine Words 3
.
MAKING SENSE OF CUISINE
OTHER PUBLICATIONS
Home Economics - another name?
Educational Catering Failure
Food Education v School Meals
Delegated Food Education
A Catering Career
A Caring Career
Curriculum - as was
Curriculum + text
Staff Development
Professionalism
Education Across the Board
Non-Pub - Nepal
Web prices
.
For the website provider
C O N T A C T
.


 

Our founder’s voice - on wine and food 



Welcome to IWFS readers.  

You have arrived at the correct page note > here and have seen from your excursion that this site presents problems. 

Non-members will read their welcome in June, written now (March 2013).  

Welcome to the IWFS.  Explore your Society Welcome on our website here.


                                                                 
 
   
Introduction

Non-members of the IWFS 
here can read about "Our founder" and a short biography by his daughter here.

This page is an extension of an article in the Society journal published in March 2013.  Previous journals are here.  
Non-IWFS members will not be able to read the article until June.

The aim, of course, is for readers to choose from Item 1 or Item 2 from the Contents list before progressing to the supplementary text. There are return links to the list as you progress through the page.

 

Contents

      1   Read the article without any supplementary material and links
> here

      2   Read the article with supplementary material and links shown in brown text  > here

      3   Other supplementary material 
> here

      4    Find Andre Simon and some of his books   
             

                    His life here.  His book on how to enjoy wine on this page > here and read it > here

                    Extracts from his "Art of Good Living" on the page
  > here

                    Extract on "Connoisseurship" from his "A Wine Primer" > here and read it on the page here.   

               "The Art of Good Living"  read it on the page > here.

                "The Commonsense of Wine" explore it > here

                 Special quotes > here
     

      5     Our President Sid Cross  > here            

                 


 


Here is the article as published:



                                                    
         Our founder’s voice - on wine and food                                 Prof Alan F Harrison

     “Food that is partnered with the right wine tastes better, 
     we enjoy it more, it is digested better and it does us more good.  
     No meal is ever dull when there is wine to drink and talk about.
”  

          
     
     Our editor Pam Brunning and I were discussing my next article using email.  Her emails were tagged with a similar quotation.  The one above comes from “The Commonsense of Wine”.  You now see the result.

     From the preface, it is difficult to extract just two or three main statements among so many.    André Simon was prolific with them across his many books.  Let’s look at these:   “Wine is a work of art with many facets: it is well worth talking about for people with inquisitive and cultured minds.”   “We all have different finger-prints so that we expect to have also different taste buds. Nobody has the monopoly of good taste .. “.   “Pleasant company at mealtime makes all the difference, and there is pleasant company to be had for the asking …”  If these and the one above were the thoughts which led him to form the IWFS, none of us would be surprised.

     When it comes to dinner planning, we will need more than a few quotations.  In his book “How to enjoy wine”, André says a lot. “There is no binding rule about dinner planning, other than avoiding excess and giving one's guests the best. But, as a guide, one will find it safe to follow the lead of the old Greek tragedies: a Prologue, three Acts and an Epilogue.”

     “The Prologue of the dinner may be either hors d'oeuvre or soup, one or the other, but not both  .. . The hors d'oeuvre should be light, tasty, even spicy morsels not likely to blunt the appetite; on the contrary, they should stimulate it. A very light, dry white wine, even a little sharp, is best to serve with hors d’oeuvre, especially if it is to be followed by a better, older, or stouter wine. Should soup be chosen as a Prologue to the dinner, a glass of sherry or Madeira is in the classical tradition.

     “Of the next three Acts or courses, the first usually is the lighter or more dainty, such as fillets of fish cooked in white wine …  .  The same white wine which was served with the hors d’oeuvre will, as a rule, prove quite acceptable with this first Act, although, on special occasions, it is usual to introduce at this stage of the meal a more costly and better wine.

     “The second Act or course is always the longest and most important: it is usually called the main course; it is more substantial, more elaborately garnished and sauced than the first, whether butcher's meat, poultry or game. It is with this course that the best wine of the evening will be served. Should there be meat, serve red Bordeaux, Burgundy or Rhone for choice.

      “The third Act or course will be the entremets salt or sweet according to whichever is the greater favourite. The wine to be served will follow suit: with a cheese souffle, for instance, the red wine served with the meat course will be in order; but if thesouffle is sweet, flavoured with vanilla or Grand Marnier, a glass of chilled Barsac or Sauternes will be much better.

     “The Epilogue is the dessert course, with or without cheese, according to taste and supplies. It is at this last stage of the meal that you should serve the fuller and stronger wines — either vintage port, brown sherry or Madeira. The cup of black coffee and the glass of brandy or liqueur are by way of a postscript to the Epilogue, one that should not be missed.”

       Good advice indeed considering how many food and wine matching events are reported in the journal. “In The Twilight” was written by André Simon in 1969, the year before he died.  He said “Dr. Johnson loved his food and brandy, but he was no gastronome. There is no ‘ gastronomy’ in his Dictionary. It was only during the Victorian age, when serious efforts were made to check excessive drinking at all social levels, that Gastronomie  was accepted in England and in English as Gastronomy.”   

      In 1951,
Andrés view of English gastronomy was “If any proof were wanted that England long since ceased to be a wine-drinking nation, one would only have to turn to English sauces: Apple sauce (sweet), Bread sauce (cloves), Curry sauce, Horseradish sauce, Mint sauce, Onion sauce, all sauces which may be excellent with water, beer or whisky, but not wine.”  (From “The Art of Good Living”).   His view today would be that England is a wine-drinking nation and he would be pleased to see the role  of his Society in confirming that it is.  No dull meals for us and always wine to drink and talk about.  “Nobody has the monopoly of good taste ..”.  Our table-talk and reputation confirm that the IWFS has the fine-meals-and-wine monopoly!

 Contents here


 
  

Here is the supplemented article.  There is new brown text and links to other material.    
                                                   

         Our founder’s voice - on wine and food                                 Prof Alan F Harrison

     "Food that is partnered with the right wine tastes better, 
     we enjoy it more, it is digested better and it does us more good.  
     No meal is ever dull when there is wine to drink and talk about.
”  

          
 
 
     Our editor Pam Brunning and I were discussing my next article using email.  Her emails were tagged with a similar quotation Note > here.  The one above  comes from “The Commonsense of Wine”.  Note > here    You now see the result.

     From the preface, it is difficult to extract just two or three main statements among so many.    André Simon was prolific with them across his many books.  Let’s look at these:   “Wine is a work of art with many facets: it is well worth talking about for people with inquisitive and cultured minds.”   “We all have different finger-prints so that we expect to have also different taste buds. Nobody has the monopoly of good taste .. “.   “Pleasant company at mealtime makes all the difference, and there is pleasant company to be had for the asking …”  If these and the one above were the thoughts which led him to form the IWFS, none of us would be surprised.

     When it comes to dinner planning, we will need more than a few quotations.  In his book “How to enjoy wine”, André says a lot. “There is no binding rule about dinner planning, other than avoiding excess and giving one's guests the best. But, as a guide, one will find it safe to follow the lead of the old Greek tragedies: a Prologue, three Acts and an Epilogue.”

     “The Prologue of the dinner may be either hors d'oeuvre or soup, one or the other, but not both  .. . The hors d'oeuvre should be light, tasty, even spicy morsels not likely to blunt the appetite; on the contrary, they should stimulate it. A very light, dry white wine, even a little sharp, is best to serve with hors d’oeuvre, especially if it is to be followed by a better, older, or stouter wine. Should soup be chosen as a Prologue to the dinner, a glass of sherry or Madeira is in the classical tradition.

     “Of the next three Acts or courses, the first usually is the lighter or more dainty, such as fillets of fish cooked in white wine …  .  The same white wine which was served with the hors d’oeuvre will, as a rule, prove quite acceptable with this first Act, although, on special occasions, it is usual to introduce at this stage of the meal a more costly and better wine.

     “The second Act or course is always the longest and most important: it is usually called the main course; it is more substantial, more elaborately garnished and sauced than the first, whether butcher's meat, poultry or game. It is with this course that the best wine of the evening will be served. Should there be meat, serve red Bordeaux, Burgundy or Rhone for choice.

      “The third Act or course will be the entremets salt or sweet according to whichever is the greater favourite. The wine to be served will follow suit: with a cheese souffle, for instance, the red wine served with the meat course will be in order; but if thesouffle is sweet, flavoured with vanilla or Grand Marnier, a glass of chilled Barsac or Sauternes will be much better.

     “The Epilogue is the dessert course, with or without cheese, according to taste and supplies. It is at this last stage of the meal that you should serve the fuller and stronger wines — either vintage port, brown sherry or Madeira. The cup of black coffee and the glass of brandy or liqueur are by way of a postscript to the Epilogue, one that should not be missed.”

Find the quotations here.

       Good advice indeed considering how many food and wine matching events are reported in the journal. “In The Twilight” was written by André Simon in 1969, the year before he died.  He said “Dr. Johnson loved his food and brandy, but he was no gastronome. There is no ‘ gastronomy’ in his Dictionary. It was only during the Victorian age, when serious efforts were made to check excessive drinking at all social levels, that Gastronomie  was accepted in England and in English as Gastronomy.”  

“In The Twilight” is mentioned by Hugh Johnson at the foot of the page here.

     In 1951,
Andrés view of English gastronomy was “If any proof were wanted that England long since ceased to be a wine-drinking nation, one would only have to turn to English sauces: Apple sauce (sweet), Bread sauce (cloves), Curry sauce, Horseradish sauce, Mint sauce, Onion sauce, all sauces which may be excellent with water, beer or whisky, but not wine.”  (From “The Art of Good Living” here).   His view today would be that England is a wine-drinking nation and he would be pleased to see the role  of his Society in confirming that it is.  No dull meals for us and always wine to drink and talk about.  “Nobody has the monopoly of good taste ..”.  Our table-talk and reputation confirm that the IWFS has the fine-meals-and-wine monopoly!



The article ended there.
 


 




“Food without wine is a corpse; wine without food is a ghost;

united and well matched they are as body and soul, living partners.”  

Andre Simon (1877-1970). 




Readers in contact with Pam Brunning will recognise the quotation tagged onto her emails.  Finding its source has proved difficult.  Pick any link from here, and you see why.  If anyone can help or if there are questions and comment about what is said in the article and its extension just click > here




  Contents here


Here is some more text for consideration:

Wine is as old as the thirst of man, not the physical thirst which man can so easily slake with water, as his horse and his dog do, but the heaven-sent thirst for what will still our fears - that our mind be at peace; and stir our sense and sensibility - that we shall not ignore nor abuse God's good gifts - wine not the least of them. > more



Dr. Johnson loved his food and brandy, but he was no gastronome. There is no ‘ gastronomy’ in his Dictionary. It was only during the Victorian age, when serious efforts were made to check excessive drinking at all social levels, that Gastronomie  was accepted in England and in English as Gastronomy. Gastronomy means the intelligent choice and appreciation of whatever is best in food and drink for Gaster the belly, as well as a lively sensual satisfaction to our sense and sight, smell and taste. There cannot be any intelligent choice nor real appreciation where there is excess.

Gastronomy stands or falls by moderation. No gourmand and no glutton can be a gastronome. No hard drinker can be a gastronome. His taste/-buds get blurred and seared by alcohol. Of course, there are gastronomes who are extravagant and who spend more than they should to have the best, just as there are motorists who buy cars beyond their means. But wealth is no more indispensable to be a gastronome than to be a motorist.


The two paragraphs came from “Andre Simon – In the Twilight”.  Published by Michael Joseph, 1969  See it > here.  

Chapter XII – GASTRONOMES, GOURMANDS and GOURMETS   –  you can read the quotation in context 
here.

Quite aside from the article, the page includes a list of items which are untraceable on the Internet. The heading:


SOME LECTURES AND ADDRESSES WHICH HAVE BEEN PUBLISHED  is there to see what readers can come up with.


 Contents here

 


Let’s move on to more of Andre’s output, this time from  - The Art of Good Living - André L Simon.


A Contribution to the better Understanding of Food and Drink together with a Gastronomic Vocabulary and a Wine Glossary

1951  Michael Joseph, London

On page 35, he says:

There are people – millions of them – for whom life simply means keeping body and soul together for as long as possible; they eat and they drink when and what they can. But there are others; there are men and women who not only live but enjoy life; who fully appreciate all that is good and beautiful, be it purple moors or the blue sea, beautiful music or beautiful wines. They are not gross materialists; on the contrary; they loathe the greed and intemperance of the glutton; they are blessed with that innate love of harmony which makes us pause and forget our cares when in our soul the echo of Beauty’s call is heard.

On the next page, Andre asks:

What is Wine?

Wine is the living blood of the grape. Wine is harmony; a marvellously complex and well-balanced blend of ever so many different substances in a solution of water and alcohol.

Controversially, on page 83 he talks about his adopted country.

If any proof were wanted that England long since ceased to be a wine drinking nation, one would only have to turn to English sauces: Apple sauce (sweet), Bread sauce (cloves), Curry sauce, Horseradish sauce, Mint sauce, Onion sauce, all sauces which may be excellent with water, beer or whisky, but not wine.

Are English people these days “well-meaning” within his earlier page 36?

There are some well-meaning people in the world, who would be only too pleased to understand wine, but who are convinced that it is beyond them; they imagine that they lack the time, the disposition or the means to become wine connoisseurs. In this they are entirely wrong. Are there not a great many people who can neither paint nor play, and yet thoroughly enjoy good music and fine painting? They can also enjoy good wine.

However, what he says generally could conclude this part of the discussion.

A sound wine is a healthy wine; health alone is harmony.  Page 36

Read the quotations in context here.

 Contents here

 


And now Andre writes as the Wine Connoisseur in his “A Wine Primer”.


Andre asks “How can you tell good wine from bad;  … ?“

By using your senses and your common-sense. By looking at it, smelling it and tasting it with critical eyes, nose and palate before committing it to your veins and your brain. Page 143

Taste your wine critically: it must be clean and pleasant. If you detect any unsavoury, sour or merely suspicious taste, spit it out as you would a bad oyster or a piece of tainted meat. if the wreath of tiny taste-buds of your tongue and palate recieve your wine joyfully, pause but one instant, again to search your memory for the name and vintage of the wine you are drinking and then swallow it gratefully.  Page 144

Details of the book:

A Wine Primer: a text-book for beginners on how to buy, keep and serve wine.

André L Simon     Publisher - Michael Joseph, 1946 – Fourth impression, 1948

Read the quotations in context here.

 Contents here


 

The Commonsense of Wine
 
     


We now read from  “The Commonsense of Wine”, page 11:



There is nowadays a great deal more to know, to do, and to see than ever before, but not a day, an hour, or a minute more, which is why there are people who will cheat hunger with a biscuit, a sandwich or a few drinks to ‘save time’. What folly!
Whatever your ambition, profession or avocation may be, what matters most is to be fit and to keep fit; it cannot be done by drugs or diet: we must enjoy our meals daily and sound sleep nightly.

Meals are an inescapable necessity, but they must never be allowed to become dull, monotonous, a chore instead of the tonic and the joy that they should be and can so easily be. Pleasant company at mealtime makes all the difference, and there is pleasant company to be had for the asking — and a few coins — in a bottle of good wine on the table.

Food that is partnered with the right wine tastes better, we enjoy it more, it is digested better and it does us more good. No meal is ever dull when there is wine to drink and talk about.  Our main quotation next to the photo of Andre.

There may be either less or more alcohol in beer or spirits than there is in wine, but what is of so much greater importance than alcohol is the fact that there are varieties of wines beyond count, so that it is always possible to find the wine that will best suit us and the fare, the company, the occasion and the mood of the day.

We all have different finger-prints so that we expect to have also different taste buds. Nobody has the monopoly of good taste and there are so many different wines, of all shades of red and gold, of all ages, of all countries, that it is great fun to hunt for and find those wines which happen to appeal to one’s own taste more than any of the others at different times.

It is quite obvious that most people have not got the time to learn all that there is to know about vineyards, wines and vintages or about the care and service of wine. They need not know much or indeed anything about wine to enjoy it, but there are nevertheless many who would like to know where the wine in their glasses came from, what sort of people made it, when, and how it was made and bottled.

Wine is a work of art with many facets: it is well worth talking about for people with inquisitive and cultured minds.


Another much-quoted sentence is:

     Wine makes every meal an occasion, every table more elegant, every day more civilized. 
     
     Andre Simon, "Commonsense of Wine" here.   Numerous sources here, few saying where the quotation is from.

     Even with a general search, that quotation arrives as seen here.

     Readers can explore
 here.

 Contents here


 


How to Enjoy Wine

Here some special quotes which the reader might be interested in:

Wine is the living blood of the grape; it possesses life; it is liable to sickness and doomed to death.   p 144 here

The Connoisseur must possess a lively sense of appreciation and be guided by good taste. Good taste is nobody’s monopoly, and different people may have good taste who have not the same tastes.  p 142  here


The order in which wines should be served varies according to individual tastes and the food served. The classical order, however, is as follows:

     With oysters, Chablis or Dry Champagne.
     With soup, Pale Sherry or Dry Madeira.
     With fish, Champagne or Dry White Wines.
     With entrées, Claret.
     With roast or game, Burgundy.
     With sweets, Sauternes.
     With cheese, Port, Brown Sherry, or Rich Madeira.  p 148 here


The published article included text from Andre's book  -- How to Enjoy Wine.


Contents here

 

The main quotations in the article:


The published article included this text from Andre's book  -- How to Enjoy Wine.  

The hors d’oeuvre should be light, tasty, even spicy morsels not likely to blunt the appetite; on the contrary, they should stimulate it. A very light, dry white wine, even a little sharp, is best to serve with hors d’oeuvre,especially if it is to be followed by a better, older, or stouter wine. Should soup be chosen as a Prologue to the dinner, a glass of sherry or Madeira is in the classical tradition.

“Of the next three Acts or courses, the first usually is the lighter or more dainty, such as fillets of fish cooked in white wine …  . 

The same white wine which was served with the hors d’oeuvre will, as a rule, prove quite acceptable with this first Act, although, on special occasions, it is usual to introduce at this stage of the meal a more costly and better wine.

“The second Act or course is always the longest and most important: it is usually called the main course; it is more sub¬stantial, more elaborately garnished and sauced than the first, whether butcher’s meat, poultry or game. It is with this course that the best wine of the evening will be served. Should there be meat, serve red Bordeaux, Burgundy or Rhone for choice.

“The third Act or course will be the entremets salt or sweet according to whichever is the greater favourite. The wine to be served will follow suit: with a cheese souffle, for instance, the red wine served with the meat course will be in order; but if thesouffle is sweet, flavoured with vanilla or Grand Marnier, a glass of chilled Barsac or Sauternes will be much better.

“The Epilogue is the dessert course, with or without cheese, according to taste and supplies. It is at this last stage of the meal that you should serve the fuller and stronger wines — either vintage port, brown sherry or Madeira. The cup of black coffee and the glass of brandy or liqueur are by way of a postscript to the Epilogue, one that should not be missed.”

Find the quotations here.


Contents here

 
 
 
 



Wine is as old as the thirst of man, not the physical thirst which man can so easily slake with water, as his horse and his dog do, but the heaven-sent thirst for what will still our fears - that our mind be at peace; and stir our sense and sensibility - that we shall not ignore nor abuse God's good gifts - wine not the least of them.

Wine is the suitably fermented juice of the grape, the fruit of the vine, a tree which is older, more universal and more fruitful than all others. Long before the earth had become habitable, before any form of animal life had appeared on land or in the waters, there were wild vines groping clumsily in search of support on the ground or clinging to the branches of shrubs and trees. At Brjamslak, in Iceland, at Sezanne, in the Marne Valley, in Silesia, the Rhineland and other places, fossils have been found which modern palaeontology ascribes to the earlier stages of our globe's formation: they bear distinct impressions of different types of wild vines, making it abundantly clear that there were at the beginning, as there are now, different members of the great Ampeladicea family, and the noblest of them all were those of the genus Vitis. ~

All members of the genus Vitis have in common the distinction of being grape-bearing, although they do not all bear wine-making grapes. There are ten known different species of Asiatic Vitis, and sixteen known American species; all of them bear grapes from which some kind of wine can be made. There is but one known European species, the Vitis vinifera, and it is the one and only one from which all the better wines of the world are made.

Today, the European Vitis vinifera flourishes in the temperate zones of all civilized countries of both the North and South hemispheres. The Portuguese introduced it in Brazil, and the Spaniards in the Argentine, Chile, Peru and Mexico, in the sixteenth century; the Dutch brought the Vitis vinifera to the Cape of Good Hope in the seventeenth century; and the British brought it to Australia and New Zealand in the late eighteenth century and early nineteenth. Strange to say, the survival of the Vitis vinifera is due to its having been grafted upon the phylloxera-resisting American Vitis labrusca.

According to Pickett's Origines Europeennes, viticulture and the art of making wine were introduced by the Aryans in India, Egypt and Persia. In Egypt there is no lack of documentary evidence that grapes were grown and that wine was made at a very early date: Delchevalerie, in his Illustration horticole, depicts the scenes of grapes being picked and pressed which formed part of the pictorial embellishments of the tomb of Phtah-Hotep, who lived in Memphis some 4,000 years before Christ. In his Chronological History of Plants, Pickering has given reproductions of similar glyptic illustrations, which he ascribes to the Third Egyptian Dynasty: he also adds that there are a number of other and more detailed illustrations of the growing of grapes and the making of wine belonging to the Fourth, Seventh and Eighth Dynasties.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Wines of the World  -  edited by Andre Simon  - McGraw-Hill - 6th print  1973  --   p 12

Contents here
 

 
   


Our President, Sid Cross gives us:


André provides three wonderful definitions:

“Gourmand” is the greedy fellow who does not mind very much about quality so long as he gets a lot: even when he is not actually asking, he is hoping for more.

“Gourmet” is the choosey eater with definite likes and dislikes of his own, who prefers quality to quantity.

“Gastronome” is the cultured and knowledgeable gourmet: his approach to all that is best to eat and drink is that of the epicurean philosopher who recognizes the ethical value of the amenities of a gracious way of living; it is not that of the materialist whose chief concern is merely sensual gratification.   source



Sid Cross

Sid, a resident of Vancouver, is recognized globally for his knowledge, tasting abilities, and connections within the many wine regions of the world, He is Wines Committee Chair for the world organization of The International Wine & Food Society headquartered in London.  He writes for several outlets and is a frequent wine judge, panelist and educator on wine and food.  Sid is the only Canadian to be inducted as a Membre d’Honneur of the L’Academie du Vin de Bordeaux and to be awarded The Gourmet of the Year by The Society of Bacchus America.  Sid has been promoted by the French Government from Chevalier to Officer status in the prestigious Ordre du Merite Agricole.  source


 Contents 
here


 
   


Site notes

A full explanation is here for later readers.

The page may need to be changed to another location in order to edit it.  The strange use of > enables quick location of internal page links. 

If any link does not work and other faults arise, the site editing problems mean that they won't be fixed.  


Contents here

 

WelcomeAllGreenSociety/1Society/2..IWFSDrinkPubsCuisineHaggis HealthStudentsLecturersPubsAuthorSpeakerContact Common Page